Moss

Moss Evie walks with her father at night in the secret moss garden the Warlock sisters play games with the jagged metal in the scrap yard the adulteress drags a boulder up a hill in penance watched by the

  • Title: Moss
  • Author: Mary Watson
  • ISBN: 9780795701818
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • Evie walks with her father at night in the secret moss garden the Warlock sisters play games with the jagged metal in the scrap yard the adulteress drags a boulder up a hill in penance, watched by the Brethren and their strangely scarred congregation such are the denizens of these intense, lush stories of good and evil, purity and contamination, desire and religion Evie walks with her father at night in the secret moss garden the Warlock sisters play games with the jagged metal in the scrap yard the adulteress drags a boulder up a hill in penance, watched by the Brethren and their strangely scarred congregation such are the denizens of these intense, lush stories of good and evil, purity and contamination, desire and religion A collection of some of the most exquisite short stories I have read in a long time Each story has been finely carved, with every little detail in place, creating such a dense system of interrelated meanings that the reader cannot skip a line without missing something vital I can honestly say that I have seldom, in South African literature, come across short stories of such suggestive power as these Andr Brink.

    • [PDF] Unlimited ✓ Moss : by Mary Watson
      Mary Watson

    About “Mary Watson

    • Mary Watson

      Hi, I m best contacted via my website or can be found on Twitter or Instagram Details above Thanks.

    496 thoughts on “Moss




    • What an incredible book Nuanced Subtle A pearled string of stories blurring narrative lines with sheer aplomb It was a felt journey of a book rolling through waves insistently moulding a beach, a loss of innocence couched in moss, myth and stark reality woven by trains and errand bees and women, women of strength and vulnerability, piercing intention and beggared dreams, sex and throaty laughter left in a shallow tide pool.


    • It was OK, and already my first African novel to read There was some strange religious sects in the last chapter trying to throw a woman from atop the hill I did not like it.



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